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microscope – Full Definition

metabolism - Full Definition

Definition of Microscope

A simple microscope is a magnifying glass that has a double convex lens with a short focal length. The examples of this kind of instrument include the hand lens and reading lens. When an object is kept near the lens, then its principal focus with an image is produced which is erect and bigger than the original object. The formed image is virtual and cannot be projected on a screen like a real image.

What Are The Parts Of Simple Microscope?

Following are the parts of the simple microscope with their functions:

  • Eyepiece: It is the lens that is used to study the samples and is placed at the top. It has a magnification of 10X to 15X.
  • Base: This provides support to the microscope.
  • Tube: This is used to connect the eyepiece to the objective lenses.
  • Objective lenses: These are found with the magnification of 10X, 40X and 100X and are colour coded. The lower power lenses are the shortest lens and the highest power lenses are the longest lens.
  • Resolving nosepiece: This is also known as the turret. It is used for holding of other objective lens and can be rotated while viewing the samples.
  • Diaphragm: It is used to control the amount of light that passes through the stage.
  • Stage: It is the platform used for placing the slides with samples.
  • Stage clip: These are used to hold the slides in proper place.
  • Coarse adjustment knob: It is used for focus on scanning.
  • Fine adjustment knob: It is used to focus on oil.
  • Arm: It is used to support the tube and connects to the base of the microscope.
  • Power switch: The main power switch used to turn on or off the microscope.
  • Condenser: It is used to focus the light on the sample and 400X power lenses are used.

Magnification Of Simple Microscope

The magnifying power formula of a simple microscope is given as:

M=1+DF

Where,

  • D is the least distance of the distinct vision
  • F is the focal length of the convex lens

Further Reading

See 〉 History | History
Source – byjus.com

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