Skip to content Skip to main navigation Skip to footer

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus – Full Definition

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - Full Definition

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus – Full Definition
Definition of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) – [ Bacteria ]
: refers to a group of Gram-positive bacteria that are genetically distinct from other strains of Staphylococcus aureus. MRSA is responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. MRSA is any strain of S. aureus that has developed, through horizontal gene transfer and natural selection, multiple drug resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. β-lactam antibiotics are a broad-spectrum group that include some penams (penicillin derivatives such as methicillin and oxacillin) and cephems such as the cephalosporins.[1] Strains unable to resist these antibiotics are classified as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, or MSSA.

MRSA is common in hospitals, prisons, and nursing homes, where people with open wounds, invasive devices such as catheters, and weakened immune systems are at greater risk of hospital-acquired infection. MRSA began as a hospital-acquired infection, but has become community-acquired, as well as livestock-acquired. The terms HA-MRSA (healthcare-associated or hospital-acquired MRSA), CA-MRSA (community-associated MRSA), and LA-MRSA (livestock-associated MRSA) reflect this.

: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.

Synonym – MRSA

SourceWikipedia

SeeExplaining Antibiotic & Antimicrobial Resistance | What is a Superbug?

%d bloggers like this: